I Was Labelled a ‘Bad Influence’ by Friends’ Mothers

I was only a primary school kid who was a little tom-boyish, plays rough games and outchase even the boys, but did well in tests and exams as well as my various ECAs. Then, I had a very close group of friends. Around 7 of us plus our siblings. My Mom and their mothers frequently organized fun little excursions, picnics and activities for us children. They watched us from far as we zipped through the parks on our bicycles and playing hide and seeks. 2 of the girls in our group were my best friends whom we wrote letters for each others and learn how to do friendship bands and cross-stitching together.

As an adult now, I would say we were good kids, but I was wrong even back then. The hair mascaras were a trend when we were around 10 or 11 and out of pure, innocent fun, one of my best friend and I decided to buy one color each to have nice temporary funky color in our hair! It was utter coolness for us boring kids! During one picnic session, her mother confronted my Mom and me about how bad an influence I was to her daughter. I never said anything about it, but I swear I was extremely hurt. This mother was someone who had known me for quite a few years and she judged who I was based on ONE matter. How could she even said something so hurting to me and suggested us not to have a close friendship from then?

badkid

Image source

At one point of life, I turned rebellious and stopped doing the ‘right’ things since the adults judged as quick as they bat their eyelids. I had a few more encounters with mothers who call me a bad influence. As I grew up and out of that depression, I became more conscious about the sort of behaviors and attitudes we should embrace towards friends and just any other humans, I found myself pondering over this matter and thinking about how she as an adult I used to look up to should have done, in order to voice her unhappiness and at the same time save a kid’s heart.

 

What I learned:

  1. Not all adults are right
  2. Never let someone inflict emotional harm on you
  3. Be kind with our words to children (and all other human beings) because they may jolly well remember it for life
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s